Plotting the Sensitivity Curves of Gravitational Waves Detectors

Sensitivity curves for different types of gravitational wave detectors with different astronomical sources.

Sensitivity curves for different types of gravitational wave detectors with different astronomical sources.

Gravitational Waves can be found in different range of frequencies, depending on the properties of the sources that they have been produced by. Usually, to detect gravitational waves in an specific range of frequency, an specific type of detector is needed such as ground-based detectors for high frequencies (e.g. LIGO, VIRGO, KAGRA, etc), space-based detectors for low frequencies (e.g. e-LISA for low frequencies and DECIGO and BBO for very low frequencies), pulsar timing arrays for extremely low frequencies (e.g. SKA, IPPT).

The main characteristics of any detector is indicated by its sensitivity curve which is a cure that shows the level of sensitivity of measuring a parameter of gravitational waves (e.g. its strain or its energy-momentum density) in terms of frequency. Plotting the sensitivity curves for different detectors is not an easy job and needs accurate experimental knowledge about the detector. This means plotting a large amount of experimental data. Well, since I am a theoretical physicist, I would like to see the experimental data about the characteristics of the detectors via experiment in a second in plot language!

Yesterday, I found a cool website created by the gravitational-wave group  at the Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge that does this job pretty quick and accurate.  Here is their website:

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/%7Erhc26/sources/

You can play around and change the options to immediately see the sensitivity curves!

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